mademoisellepremed

50 things I learned about med school from med students

miss-sassmaster:

I’ve had the chance to talk to different medical student from different schools, both MD and DO, public and private schools, and all other parts of the spectrum.

These are based off things I was told! I haven’t started med school yet, so I can’t actually testify. But I figure with they went through it and had some good advice and things to say, hey why not?

This isn’t exactly as it’s gonna go down. You make your own experiences and will find your own way.

First year

  1. This is hardest you will have ever done. So far.
  2. Even though it seems like you have no time, you really do. Now is the time to go to social events and make friends.
  3. Take pictures with everyone at your white coat ceremony.
  4. Anatomy has three types of people on the first day; the people who are way too fascinated, the ones who cry because they are cutting open a dead person, and the people who throw up into the slop bucket.
  5. Always flip the body slowly and with precision. Unless you want a formaldehyde and fat shower.
  6. You might fail your first test. Cry a lot then get over it.

Read More

mymedlife
mymedlife:

cranquis:

diarymdstudent:

mymedlife:

Why do you think those two are hugging and crying? my resident asks as we watch our attending embrace a man about his age. It’s because one year ago that patient was given four months to live. I saw him then, he looked like he was on his deathbed.
No one knew what he had
But our attending figured it out. He diagnosed him.
It was a rare form of leukemia.
You know it’s rare when Google’s feeble attempts to help out only turns up a handful of journal articles.
Do you know how he knew?
He read an article about it a few weeks before. 
Everyone laughed at him, but he remembered that article and demanded we run the tests. 
Turns out, he was right.
Never forget, reading saves lives. 
To the first years, just staring out your med school journey, not sure why they signed up for this. To those who just finished boards, and never want to pick up a text book again. To the premeds, who just want to finish up their pre reqs and get to medical school already. To the spouses, who wonder if they will ever see their significant others without a textbook again.
This is why we do it.
This is why we stay up past our bedtimes.
And wake up before the sun.
This is why we memorize overly complicated pathways until we can do them in our sleep.
Why we can name every class of antibiotic, even those no one uses anymore.
This is why we push ourselves to be better every day than we were the last.
Why we put our lives on hold.
Not for more letters to put behind our name.
Not for some number on a score sheet.
Not because mom told us to.
We do it because one day, a day that will occur far faster than we are ready for, we’ll have our own patients.
One day someone will come in and ask you “so doc, what is it.” And you’ll say to yourself, I know this.
So when the tediousness of studying gets you down, don’t forget:
Reading saves lives.

This feels like it needs epic music to go with it. 

Compose the music and I’ll sing this from the rooftops.

(In all seriousness — this is an important reminder for all physicians and healthcare providers, before/during/after school/exams/residency/beyond!)

Quick someone start composing. I’m betting we have enough musicians on here we can get an epic Lord of the Rings-esque piece going. 
I’ll dust off the ol’ flute

mymedlife:

cranquis:

diarymdstudent:

mymedlife:

Why do you think those two are hugging and crying? my resident asks as we watch our attending embrace a man about his age. It’s because one year ago that patient was given four months to live. I saw him then, he looked like he was on his deathbed.

No one knew what he had

But our attending figured it out. He diagnosed him.

It was a rare form of leukemia.

You know it’s rare when Google’s feeble attempts to help out only turns up a handful of journal articles.

Do you know how he knew?

He read an article about it a few weeks before.

Everyone laughed at him, but he remembered that article and demanded we run the tests.

Turns out, he was right.

Never forget, reading saves lives.

To the first years, just staring out your med school journey, not sure why they signed up for this. To those who just finished boards, and never want to pick up a text book again. To the premeds, who just want to finish up their pre reqs and get to medical school already. To the spouses, who wonder if they will ever see their significant others without a textbook again.

This is why we do it.

This is why we stay up past our bedtimes.

And wake up before the sun.

This is why we memorize overly complicated pathways until we can do them in our sleep.

Why we can name every class of antibiotic, even those no one uses anymore.

This is why we push ourselves to be better every day than we were the last.

Why we put our lives on hold.

Not for more letters to put behind our name.

Not for some number on a score sheet.

Not because mom told us to.

We do it because one day, a day that will occur far faster than we are ready for, we’ll have our own patients.

One day someone will come in and ask you “so doc, what is it.” And you’ll say to yourself, I know this.

So when the tediousness of studying gets you down, don’t forget:

Reading saves lives.

This feels like it needs epic music to go with it. 

Compose the music and I’ll sing this from the rooftops.

(In all seriousness — this is an important reminder for all physicians and healthcare providers, before/during/after school/exams/residency/beyond!)

Quick someone start composing. I’m betting we have enough musicians on here we can get an epic Lord of the Rings-esque piece going. 

I’ll dust off the ol’ flute

ladykaymd

Anonymous asked:

When in your opinion would be the best time to have a child in med school? I would wait till done with residency but my mom is already getting really old (she'll be 71 when I finish) and I want her to be more part of my child's life.

ladykaymd answered:

Oooh. Gosh. I got told early in my med school time that there is “no good time to have a child in medicine—so you just have one when it’s the right time for you!” 

I know a lot of people who have had kids during fourth year because you have a little bit more flexibility in your schedule and might be able to take time off. I know one person who had a child right before we started studying for step because they would be off and home during that time (but studying and being a new parent seems really hard!!). 

There won’t be a good time—ever. So you just pick the time that’s right for you in your life and then you make it work. Someone has made it work at all times in medical school and you could too!! Also, remember, that if you need to take a year off and have some time for your family—you can do that! 

My Ob/gyn has told me that the best time to have children is when you’re still in a position for people to cover you. She suggested trying fourth year after your interview season, or having your child/ren before interviews even started. Mostly because of male perceptions of females than because it should actually matter.

But I agree with the advice that Ladykay gave, because there will never be a good time. Children are hard work, and you will have to figure it out no matter when you have your children. Do it when it is right for you, and you will adjust accordingly.

cherishmd

cherishmd:

ladykaymd:

This is my Christmas gift to all of you!

I have typed up flashcards from the 2014 First Aid including all the rapid review sections in the back, some of the more crammable facts about immunology (CD markers, HLA subtypes, etc), and the biggest gift of all I’ve typed up every drug in the entire FA including all the information that was listed with each one. 

I can’t promise I haven’t made any errors, but everything should be listed exactly as it is in the 2014 First Aid. :) 

Feel free to use to study or download to your iPad for review if you so wish. 

Thank you, Lady Kay!

cyanide-poisoning
I am fundamentally an optimist. Whether that comes from nature or nurture, I cannot say. Part of being optimistic is keeping one’s head pointed toward the sun, one’s feet moving forward. There were many dark moments when my faith in humanity was sorely tested, but I would not and could not give myself up to despair. That way lays defeat and death.
nelson mandela ‘a long walk to freedom’ (via cyanide-poisoning)